Archive for the ‘hockey’ Category


Stick Specifications:

Model: T-70

Curve: PP09 (Ryan), ½” heel curve, 5.5 lie, round toe (left handed)

Flex: 85

Non grip surface

Where to buy: http://nekoti.co.uk

SherWood hockey sticks have been one of those sticks that when I was growing up, it was THE stick to have and this is going back to the days of wooden sticks. The company has been producing sticks steadily and has two ranges it now produces. There is the Nexon range of equipment and the T-range, or True Touch. We have been testing a T-70 stick from SherWood, which lands near the top range of the True Touch range, surpassed only by the T-90 in the range.

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The SherWood T-70 side profile. The markings on the shaft are due to rubbing grip wax and stick tape on it for improved grip

The stick that we tested is an 85 flex (left handed), with PP09, or the Bobby Ryan blade pattern. The stick came without grip coating, though grip versions are available. Provided to us by SherWood’s partner Nekoti Hockey, the T-70 is a stick that felt familiar to the hands out of its wrappings.

The stick weighs slightly more than some of the other manufacturers’ sticks in the market, though there is not much difference in the overall weight. When we compared the sticks’ weight against other sticks in similar range, such as the CCM U+ Pro, the T-70 weight is similar, so it gives you an idea of the type of stick we’ve got here. However, the T-70 is equally balanced throughout, meaning it doesn’t feel heavier towards the blade. The added weight in the stick is due to the materials used to make the stick a bit more durable than lighter sticks, but more about the durability a bit later on.

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The T-70 blade with Ryan curve

The blade on the T-70 has a foam core centre to it, which reduces the vibrations throughout the shaft when receiving a pass or taking a shot. Though foam core technologies are commonplace in most hockey sticks today, SherWood have engineered a stick where the foam really makes the blade more responsive. Due to the design of the blade, it feeds remarkably well to the hands and you have a good feel for the puck at all times.

When we first started to use the T-70 one thing we had to get used to was the non-grip coating on the stick. Having used grip coating for a number of years, it took a while to get used to the feel of the stick and the way it handles than normal. However, the age old trick of rubbing some stick tape or grippy wax on the shaft resolved the issue.

The Shaft:

The shaft of the stick uses a build that ensures optimal flexibility, weight and balance and provides an excellent response potential, according to SherWood’s description of the stick. How that translates on the ice is quite accurate. When we first started using the stick, we found that it was really quick to load and noticed that it somewhat improved the velocity of shots. We say somewhat as we don’t have a speed gun to measure the shots, but there is a definitive, noticeable difference in shot speed and power.

Additionally, what we usually find with new sticks is that it takes a while to get the optimum flex from the shaft, but on the first try the SherWood T-70 was quick to load. Though the flex has improved and has become more and more responsive the more we used it, the T-70 provided perhaps the quickest response on first time use than other sticks we have tested or used.

Otherwise, the shaft uses a design with rounded edges, making it feel good in the hand. The shaft’s circumference is not as big as some of the other makes like Easton S series, which for our test was great. Though the shaft’s circumference is not as big as others, it hasn’t sacrificed much in feel or  durability.

Durability

Durability of a hockey stick is perhaps one of the key considerations when buying a new stick. You want to be sure that your hard earned cash gets you a stick that does not snap on the first use and you want to be comfortable in the knowledge that the stick is capable of handling your shot selection.

The SherWood T-70 stick is quite durable thanks to the materials SherWood has used in the construction of the shaft. It has a unidirectional fiber core and combines fiberglass and carbon fiber weave in a custom blend to provide added durability. Though these materials provide extra durability in the shaft the downside is that they add in the weight of the stick. However, despite this, the stick is equally balanced, providing you with good flexibility and response potential.

The stick we have been testing has been used both in the training setting and in league level games. In games where hacking and slashing is common place, the stick has gotten a few scuff marks, but is not demonstrating any wear in the actual build of the stick, i.e. there are no chunks of the shaft or blade missing, only some paint work, which is to be expected.

The Blade:

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Curve comparison. Next to the CCM CL with 19 (Tavares) pattern. The T-70 blade is slightly shorter, but in similar specification

As said, the stick we have been using comes with the PP09 (Ryan) curve, which is a ½” heel curve blade with a 5.5 lie and round toe. Modelled after the Anaheim Ducks star, Bobby Ryan, the blade pattern is closely matched by those of CCM’s Tavares (or 19), Reeboks’ Spezza or Phaneuf (P36 or P36A), Easton’s Cammalleri/Zetterberg, or Bauer’s Staal (P91).

The transition to the blade was quite easy as the stick we previously had in use was with a CCM Tavares (19) pattern and as the image shows, there is very little in between the two. Though at the start and the first few shots with the stick did fly over the net and there was some getting used to required, the blades were quite similarly matched in terms of the pattern.

Thanks to the foam core used in the T-70 blade, the blade does feed through to the shaft really well and does what SherWood says with the description in that it reduces the vibration when taking a shot. Like mentioned the foam core in a hockey stick blade is by no means unique these days, but the way it is deployed in the shaft makes all the difference. You might remember from the Beaster stick review where we mentioned that the blade didn’t really feed through to the shaft properly, but with the T-70 there were no such issues. When you receive a pass you know that he puck is on your blade and you don’t have to spend time with your head down wondering whether or not the puck is on your blade.

In game situations:

We have now been using the stick for about a month and in game situations we have beenImage notching up points with the stick since the first game we used it in. Like mentioned the stick is durable and has withstood the toils of a hockey game really well. The stick responds well to shot selections and like mentioned the talk of shot velocity is not a lie. Specially with wrist shots, the stick is in its element, though having said that, its not a stick that is designed to snipe wristers but can also handle a heavy slap shot with ease and has helped hit the top shelf on more than one occasion both in trainings and in games.

Conclusion:

The SherWood T-70 stick is a great stick and recommended for league players, or to those who are looking for a stick that is both durable and incredibly responsive. The features set that the stick offers is closely matched by the CCM U+ Pro, but is cheaper than many of the other sticks at this range. By no means is the price a sign of a bad stick as with the SherWood T-70, you get a stick that performs equally well, if not better than some of the competing sticks in the same category. Whilst it may not come packed with all the features of the T-90, the T-70 is definitely a stick where price, durability and performance meet.

Pros:

  • Design of the shaft fits perfectly in your hand
  • Responsiveness
  • Quick load and release
  • No vibrations through the shaft
  • Good price point
  • Great balance throughout the stick

Cons:

  • Non grip coating (Only on the model we tested)
  • Heavier than some other sticks in similar range

You can buy the SherWood T-70 and other hockey gear at:

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Helmet is probably one of the most important pieces of protective equipment that a hockey player wears. Not only is a helmet responsible for protecting your head during play, but one of the other key duties it has is to allow enough air flow to ensure that the players are still able to think and perform their plays and roles effectively without overheating.

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M11 Helmet fitted with Hejduk visor. The helmet is compatible with majority of visors on the market.

Having played the game for a number of years and having worn a number of different helmets all the way from the Gretzky Jofa to the Selanne Fishbowl and beyond. Additionally, as regular readers will know, I have a history of concussions, hence making the helmet selection process a delicate and meticulous process. In the past it was all about the ‘Mirror test’ of what looked good, rather than the protective features of the helmet, but now increasingly players and manufacturers alike are paying attention to the protection from rotational forces and direct impacts to the head.

Enter Cascade Hockey’s M11 helmet. The helmet has been at the forefront of helmet technology for a couple of years now and has made a significant effort in reducing the risk of concussion in a contact sport. Though it is important to note that no helmet will protect you fully from a concussion, but the Cascade M11 has made a conscious effort to dramatically reduce the risk of one.

As a side note, Cascade Hockey was recently acquired by Bauer, but the M11 line will carry on with Mark Messier still leading the development, which should ensure further leaps and bounds in terms of R&D

The helmet itself differs from majority of the competition on the market in that the helmet shell is all one piece. The likes of Reebok, CCM, Warrior and Bauer all use two piece outer shell construction in the helmet design.  So far I’ve only come across the M11 and the Easton that rely on this design.

The single shell design distributes impact forces better than the traditional two piece shell. The only downside with the design and on the M11 is that it can look a bit bulkier than other traditional styled helmets, but it’s not in the league of bulk of the Warrior helmets.

The Fit:

When I was choosing the helmet, I tested and tried on the 11k from Reebok, The V10 from CCM (which I had previously), RE-AKT from Bauer and The E700 from Easton. However, none of the helmets were as comfortable out of the box as the M11 was.

My previous helmet was the CCM V10 and where I was looking to carry on using the model, I was sold on the M11 pretty much from the moment I fitted it on my head. As I mentioned I have had a history with concussions, so the research and technology behind it made the helmet appealing. Given that the CCM V10 helmet hasn’t really changed since it’s launch, it came down to the choice between the M11 and Bauer’s RE-AKT helmet.

Yes the RE-AKT is lighter than the M11, BUT the deciding factor, swinging it in M11’s favour was the fit of it. Even with the RE-AKT adjusted appropriately, it didn’t fit properly and the helmet still wobbled on my head if I shook my head, which was something I was looking to avoid. What I was looking from my helmet was something that stays in place and doesn’t move in case of a particularly heavy hit.

The M11’s tool free adjusting mechanism, or the ratchet system, at the back of the helmet ensures that the helmet sits properly. There is only a single mechanism used to adjust it, comparing it to the other helmets majority of helmets, bar Easton, where you have to lift up two or more flaps to adjust the helmet.

What I really like on the M11 is the adjustment coming from the back of the helmet, making it sit nice and tight on the head.

Foam wars

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The inside of the helmet and the foam. The foam ensures comfortable fit of the helmet.

The thing that really sets the M11 apart from the other helmets is the foam within the helmet. Traditionally the pro-level and high end helmets use what is called an EPP foam. EPP Foam is not by any means bad, but it does not possess the same features as the M11’s foam.  The way the foam has been designed to react to impact is to return to its original shape as fast as possible, which in turn provides better protection as the integrity of the foam has been restored a lot quicker. The foam and the cylinders that sit between the foam and the shell of the helmet have been designed to spread the force of the impact to a larger area, thus minimising the direct impact to the head.

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Under the foam you’ll find the cylinders that have been designed to return to their original shape soon from an impact. This reduces the risk of head injuries in case of multiple impacts to the same location.

The foam is definitely more comfortable than some of the other foams in helmets. The only thing I have experienced with it, which is something that has happened with every helmet, is initial headaches when first wearing the helmet on the ice. It has taken a while for the foam to adjust to the shape of my head, but it is something that I have encountered with other helmets throughout my playing days.

Customising and Fitting visors etc.

The one thing that was quite funky with the helmet was that you are able to customise the colours of the vents. At the pro shop where I got the helmet from, they offered to change the white coloured vents on my helmet to a desired colour, but I decided to stick with them as they came. Further to the point, if you are ordering the helmet directly through the Messier Project home page, you can truly customise the helmet colour and the colours of the vents.

The biggest problem I had with the helmet was installing a visor and removing the ear guards. The trouble is that some of the screws sit behind the foam and the cylinders inside the helmet, requiring a bit of handy work and in my case as I have no skill in DIY and incredibly short attention span with the screwdriver it was a bit of an up-hill battle in having the visor installed.

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The vents on the side of the helmet can be changed to fit your desired colour.

The helmet when I got it came with a cage, but the guys at my pro shop (Sportia-10), were kind enough to remove it for me.

Overall:

The M11 is a great helmet, and I would go as far as to say that it is the best helmet you have never heard about. The price point for the helmet (€149 without visor or $119 on hockey monkey/$144 regular retail price) comes in lower than the E700 or the 11k from Reebok, but is slightly more expensive than the CCM V10 helmet.

The M11 provides superior protection while providing comfort. Where it is not as light weight as my previous V10 helmet, I hardly notice the difference between the two. The M11 stays in place when being hit and does not wobble around on the head when adjusted appropriately, something that other helmets can do.

I would thoroughly recommend the helmet to anyone looking to buy a new one or look out for the M11 Pro line as an alternative.

Pros:

  • Incredible fit. Helmet does not wobble on head and sits comfortably at the desired position
  • Comfortable to wear
  • Customisable
  • Easy to adjust
  • Single shell design provides superior protection
  • SEVEN technology is a definite plus for the helmet and helps spread the force of the impact to a wider area and returns to normal shape quicker
  • Great ventilation throughout

Cons:

  • Fiddly: Some screws not easy to get to when fitting visor/cage or removing ear guards.
  • Breaking in pains
  • Heavier when compared to the Easton E700 or Bauer RE-AKT

More info and dealer locations can be found at: http://www.cascadeicehockey.com/

 


I took a bit of a break yesterday from the rigours of summer training and the heat and went to watch a beginners recreational game that I knew was on. Well I knew it was on as my wife plays for the team I was watching. I didn’t really know what to expect from the game, after all what could a group of “beginners” (playing against other beginners) offer me. To be honest I was pleasantly surprised.

Sure I wasn’t watching hockey at its fastest, but I actually found myself getting really into the game and before I knew it, I was watching with bated breath as each scoring opportunity unfolded and the goalies at both ends of the ice were jumping in front of the puck and battling through traffic.

What I found great about the game was something that I think I often forget in hockey and in the midst of a game or, in fact, the season is that it should be fun. The smiles, the high fives, the encouragement that was shown to each other on the bench was something really great to watch. More to the point, the players on the team were living and breathing every moment of the game. For some it was their first game of their lives, for others it was the first game of their season. It’s not often you see players coming off the ice after a shift with a smile on their face, even if they didn’t score. The reason why they were smiling was because they were having fun.

My wife actually said to me when she joined the team that “I know I’m not going to be a superstar in hockey, what I really want is to enjoy it and have fun with it.” I think that sentence and statement epitomises what the game essentially is. We all got into hockey, either playing or watching, because it is fun. I think the fun is what drives us to the rink again and again to play the game, or to watch our teams. For some players at the top of their game, the fun has turned into something serious, a bread winner, a profession and sometimes it is difficult for guys to remember that we need to have fun with the game and enjoy every moment within the game.

Hockey can give us so much, whether we are spectators or players. It can give us some of the greatest memories that we have and friendships. It is the achievements, seeing your team do well or your personal skills as a player come forward in leaps and bounds.

However, at least with me, sometimes we forget the fun of it. We play the game to win and we rev our minds and our bodies to do whatever it takes to win. When the big W’s come, hockey is a lot of fun and we are smiling, but when the string of losses come round we forget to have fun and things become tense. We often hear professionals in the midst of a losing streak say “We just got to go out there and have some fun with it”, and it is true. If you’re not having fun, things are not working.

I know I’m a bad loser as I always want to win and everything, mentally, is geared towards doing anything it takes to win, but when all of that turns into a loss, the disappointment can be too much to take and the game you fell in love with can start to feel like a chore.

Even if my wife’s team lost yesterday, I didn’t see a single disappointed player on their team. I know I would’ve been grumpy for days after a 5-6 loss. However, these guys were happy with their performance, despite losing the lead late in the game. They had fun. They came together to enjoy the game and I think (as a spectator) that they were overjoyed by the fact they scored five goals. The smiles they had on their faces after each shift made me wish I could do the same.

In-fact, thanks to these guys, I have now added another emblem on my gloves. I have for years played with the word SISU written on the palm of my left glove, but it’s now accompanied by the word SMILE, to remind me to enjoy and have fun with the game.

Thanks Basingstoke Raptors for reminding me of something that I sometimes forget and take for granted.


If the IIHF World Championships haven’t received enough negative press due to the high ticket prices and the near empty arenas, further devastation for the games came as the headline sponsor Skoda is considering its investment with the games.

Skoda has been the headline sponsor of the World Championships for twenty years and has become synonymous with the games. Year on year Skoda has displayed its latest models at the games and was most recently one of the parties that brought the World Championships games on to YouTube. Finnish tabloid Ilta-Lehti has quoted Skoda’s Swedish PR chief Mikael Sandberg who said that “the spectator numbers have been below expectations and as the headline sponsor we need to react. What exactly will happen, I don’t know.”

According to Swedish Dagens Media news portal, Skoda is blaming the organisers of the games for the high ticket prices, which have been sited for the low attendance at the games. However, Skoda has apparently been pleased over the decision to lower the ticket prices.

 

(Edit) According to the Finnish representative for Skoda, Helkama Auto, Skoda has an agreement with the IIHF until 2017. Though the Finnish and Swedish offices don’t really have a say in whether or not Skoda will review its sponsorship strategy, but it wouldn’t surprise me if the company decided to review its investment after the current world championships. Where it is likely that Skoda will be on board until 2017, it might look at 2012 as a turning point of the agreement, specially as the 2013 IIHF world championships will be hosted by Sweden and Finland again.

 

The second headline sponsor of the IIHF World Championships, Kyocera, is more careful about its assessment and critique as Bo Gustavson, director of marketing for the Nordics said “Obviously we want there to be as many spectators as possible. Unfortunately, we can’t control the ticket prices for the games.”

Losing the main sponsor would be a heavy blow to the World Championships as I for one have become to associate Skoda with hockey and the World Championships. IF the worst case scenario takes place, it will be a tough job finding a new headline sponsor in the current climate. Though having said that, even DHL forked out a dumb amount of money to have its logo appear on the Manchester United training kit, so I guess if the World Championships brand appeals to a company anything is possible. I have to get a snipe in here and say that with these ticket prices, it would be fitting if the headline sponsor was a luxury goods company.

Since Finland announced new ticket gategories (Fan package and Family Package) to the Finland vs France game and Finland vs Kazakhstan game, the ticket sales has picked up. Infact the organisers reported that the game against France has been sold out and that there were only a few tickets remaining for the Kazakhstan game (reported yesterday).

However, in Globen, the game between Czech Republic and Norway saw only 800 spectators fill the seats. Norway’s Mads Hansen said “It was boring. I’ve played in several World Championship games, but this felt like an exhibition game somewhere in the Italian alps. Sweden is a hockey country and I would’ve expected more than this.”

It will be interesting to see how the arenas fill up with the reduced prices. 800 spectators at an international tournament is a bit of a travesty. I’ve seen more spectators than that in some bush league games.


(Edit: I’ve had an issue with WordPress and the HTML code, where the formatting looks pretty messy right now, I’m going to attempt to tweak it tomorrow)

I’ve been wanting to do a post about the latest hockey gear that’s come out. There’s always been a part of me that’s been really interested in the different makes out there and how the kit differs from one another. Before I go any further, I must stress that this is only based on information and marketing collateral, rather than my own opinion. I would absolutely love to review these products properly, so if any of the manufacturers read this are into the idea, drop me a line.

We start off with Bauer. Bauer has been a staple of the hockey world for, probably as long as hockey has been around. Since getting rid of the Nike Bauer brand, the company has brought out some of the most preferred equipment we see the NHL Pros use.

Skates:
Bauer has brought out the Bauer Supreme Total One NXG to accompany the APX to its flagship range of skates. The Total One NXG features a new TUUK fusion blade, which has been designed to reduce the weight of the runner by 27%. As with most skates today, a lot of attention is being paid to the fit. The emphasis is on getting the skate as comfortable as possible and the Total ONE NXG features a new insole that supposedly gives a better fit and more responsive skate.

Helmet:
The one big thing that Bauer has brought out is the RE-AKT helmet. The helmet takes its look from the HH4500 helmet. Rather annoyingly I’ve seen some adverts and sites advertise the helmet with the ‘passes the mirror test’ tag, which is just a personal pet peeve of mine. The RE-AKT has been designed to reduce the risk of concussion from direct impact to the head. At impact, the helmet’s SUSPEND-TECH free floating liner should move independently from the VERTEX FOAM liner to should reduce excessive intra-cranial movement.  Phew, don’t you just love these terms SUSPEND-TECH, VERTEX FOAM. Wow

Sticks:

While during the playoffs, I have seen many players use a new-ish TotalOne stick I haven’t seen further details of it emerge as yet so I don’t know what to say about it. However, the Bauer Vapor APX stick has been around for a while, but I thought that I’d include it in the round up anyways. Bauer claims that it is the smartest stick in the history of the game. The stick supposedly fits all types of shots and combines the Intelli-Sense Shot Technology and Bauer TotalOne’s blade to give it that soft feel.

CCM:

CCM has been a brand I’ve been using ever since Koho was swallowed up by the Hockey Company. I used Koho sticks/blades nearly my whole life. For the roundup, CCM doesn’t have a new skate to include as it is going with its U+ CL skate. Perhaps the biggest additions to the range is in the field of the protective equipment.

CCM has expanded its U+ CL range to the protective equipment and should a player wear CL shoulder pads, CL elbow pads, CL shin guards, CL skates, CL gloves (introduced last year) and use a CL stick, the overall equipment weight would be reduced by 25% compared to other manufacturers. Impressive, but my main question is: If it’s that light, will it be any good at protecting the body. There is also the CS, or Crazy Strong, variant of the equipment line available as well.

Shoulder pads

The CL pads feature CCM’s U-foam caps and molded floating ventilated sternum. The U-Foam has also been utilised in the body of the body of the shoulder pads. The pads look pretty decent, but I’d have to get my hands on them to see what they are really like. There isn’t much else to report on the pad and its features apart from the fact that it contains a lot of U-Foam.

Elbow pads

The CL elbow pads feature a 3-piece construction and reinforced caps. The pads come with a neoprene wrap in the liner and also features neoprene in the elbow bed for improved fit. For the forearm and bicep there is U-Foam protection.

Shin guards:

The CL shinguards feature vented caps and an anatomical shell design. The thigh guard can be removed for a bit of customisation. I personally don’t like the thigh guard in my pads so it’s good to see that it continues to be a removable feature. The knee bed is segmented with neoprene lock zone, which should ensure that the pads stay in place and provide additional comfort. The pads are attached with cross strapped in the back, which allows for the calf wrap to provide protection to the back of the leg.

Sticks

The CL stick hasn’t really changed much since the last re-vamp of it. It now carries the name of CCM CL Midnight. Otherwise the features of the stick looks the same. The biggest improvements as far as I can see on paper are in the construction. CCM has introduced something it calls True Spear technology which is supposed to ensure optimal energy transfer for shots.

The other stick is the U+ Pro, which comes weighing in at 455 grams. Like the CL Midnight, it uses aerial grade carbon to make it a lightweight stick. The blade uses PRB Graphite technology to create a similar sweet spot for an accurate shot. Like the CL the stick also includes the true spear technology.

Perhaps the most interesting stick from the CCM Staple is the RBZ, which is set to come out in Fall 2012. We’ve seen pictures of it and know it’s been used by Ryan Nugent-Hopkins and Gabriel Landesgok and that it’s been designed in partnership with the golf company TaylorMade. That’s all I’ve managed to dig out on the stick so far.

 

 

 

For great deals on top of the range hockey equipment, please click on the image below:


When Canada last won the world championship in ice hockey, I read an article where it said that Canada had turned a new leaf in its approach to the world championships. In all the hegemony, the Canadians were saying that they no longer viewed the games as a guys holiday, with a chance to play some hockey in between and that every player there was playing to make their country proud.
The same could not be said of some of the Canadian players at the 2012 team. Three days into the games and what has Canada done? Played a sluggish game against Slovakia  and then lost to the USA in overtime. Before the Slovakia game it was reported that Canada cancelled its morning skate and a short while after it emerged that the Canadian players had been sampling the wares at Henry’s Pub in Helsinki.

After the USA game reports emerged that the Canadians were parting until 3am at Circus in Helsinki. There were a few tweets that suggested that there would’ve been fisticuffs involved at the end of the night as well, but no official word on the fight have emerged.

(EDIT 11:14BST 08/05/12) There have been further updates on what has supposedly been said and I thought that I’d update the story. Getzlaf reportedly shook his fist and said “You don’t want any of this” and reportedly said that he would “knock everyone out in three minutes.” It would appear that the initial reports of the scuffle weren’t as bad as first thought, but there was some shouting. Some outlets have also reported that Getzlaf also shouted he was the captain of the Anaheim Ducks. Maybe not the smartest thing to shout at the heat of the moment, given that Finns follow the Ducks closely because of one Teemu Selanne. The original text that appeared in this blog can now be read at the bottom of the story.

IF the Canadians keep going like they are they will be one of the biggest disappointments of the games. There are two players on that roster that have looked like they actually want to be there and play for their country and that’s Jeff Skinner and John Tavares. All the Getzlaf’s, Corey Perry’s and the like are in summer holiday mode. Getzlaf even admitted that he did not play or get on the ice for a month before the tournament. Is this the type of player you want wearing the C for your team? Is this a good example of leadership? The only thing Getzlaf is capable of leading at the moment is the off ice activities for Canada. I think he picked out a few favourite joints to hang out in during the NHL opener in Helsinki.

I tweeted last night saying that Ducks should seek to trade Getzlaf. He is on the final year of his contract, but I don’t think the Ducks should commit their long term future to a player who is good when he wants to be. Getzlaf can be a great player when he wants to be, but most of the time he looks like he doesn’t want to be.

As for Canada for the rest of the tournament? You can never count them out, that’s for sure, but will all the off ice activities and enjoying a roadie with the boys lead to the teams’ demise and out of the medal games. It’s OK to party to get the game out of your system, but when you are playing for your country, make sure that you do it in the off season, not the night before the game.

 

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Original excerpt from above:

More details have emerged from the Canadian players’ night out on town. There was a bit of a scuffle at the bar when Ryan Getzlaf took exception to a group of Finnish men at the bar. There had been some back and forth verbalisation before slight pushing and shoving. Getzlaf reportedly shoke hist fist vigorously and said “Don’t make me use this, I will strike you all down.” The bouncers broke up the blossoming brawl, and moved the players out of the club, but there was more shouting outside.


EDIT: Please see post here about recent developments: http://pushforpros.wordpress.com/2012/05/10/iihf-world-championships-iihf-bins-live-youtube-streams/

The news has literally just broken on Twitter with the IIHF announcing that all of the games from the 2012 Ice Hockey World Championships will be streamed live via YouTube.

In a move that resembles the KHL’s startegy of showing games free of charge on YouTube, is bound to attract more fans to look at the games and watch the videos. However, it is still expected that the IIHF will offer paid for packages for the games where you can buy rights to watch the games of your chosen team.

However, the offer is not available to all as some countries have been geo-blocked. The list of Geo-Blocked countries includes: Belarus, Denmark, Estonia, Kazakhstan, Latvia, Lithuania, Norway, Russia, Sweden, Ukraine and the USA. EDIT: It has now emerged (at 14:46 GMT) that the games will also be geo-blocked in Finland.

(Edit: I have deleted the paragraph about the Finnish TV rights for the games) I can only suspect that the YouTube streaming would’ve hurt the TV and media partners of the games, though I doubt that the decision to stream the games came from the Helsinki/Stockholm organising committee but from the IIHF itself. However, it is a welcome move to offer the games via YouTube.

I for one (based on my geographic location) applaud the IIHF’s decision to move. It is a bold new strategy and will expose the sport to a wider fan base, which will be great for the sport.

The YouTube channel can be found at: http://www.youtube.com/icehockey.

The schedule for the games is here: http://www.iihf.com/competition/272/home-oc/tournament-info/game-schedule.html Please note that the game times are in Swedish and Finnish times respectively.

Your move NHL!