Posts Tagged ‘CCM Hockey’


Stick Specifications:

Model: T-70

Curve: PP09 (Ryan), ½” heel curve, 5.5 lie, round toe (left handed)

Flex: 85

Non grip surface

Where to buy: http://nekoti.co.uk

SherWood hockey sticks have been one of those sticks that when I was growing up, it was THE stick to have and this is going back to the days of wooden sticks. The company has been producing sticks steadily and has two ranges it now produces. There is the Nexon range of equipment and the T-range, or True Touch. We have been testing a T-70 stick from SherWood, which lands near the top range of the True Touch range, surpassed only by the T-90 in the range.

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The SherWood T-70 side profile. The markings on the shaft are due to rubbing grip wax and stick tape on it for improved grip

The stick that we tested is an 85 flex (left handed), with PP09, or the Bobby Ryan blade pattern. The stick came without grip coating, though grip versions are available. Provided to us by SherWood’s partner Nekoti Hockey, the T-70 is a stick that felt familiar to the hands out of its wrappings.

The stick weighs slightly more than some of the other manufacturers’ sticks in the market, though there is not much difference in the overall weight. When we compared the sticks’ weight against other sticks in similar range, such as the CCM U+ Pro, the T-70 weight is similar, so it gives you an idea of the type of stick we’ve got here. However, the T-70 is equally balanced throughout, meaning it doesn’t feel heavier towards the blade. The added weight in the stick is due to the materials used to make the stick a bit more durable than lighter sticks, but more about the durability a bit later on.

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The T-70 blade with Ryan curve

The blade on the T-70 has a foam core centre to it, which reduces the vibrations throughout the shaft when receiving a pass or taking a shot. Though foam core technologies are commonplace in most hockey sticks today, SherWood have engineered a stick where the foam really makes the blade more responsive. Due to the design of the blade, it feeds remarkably well to the hands and you have a good feel for the puck at all times.

When we first started to use the T-70 one thing we had to get used to was the non-grip coating on the stick. Having used grip coating for a number of years, it took a while to get used to the feel of the stick and the way it handles than normal. However, the age old trick of rubbing some stick tape or grippy wax on the shaft resolved the issue.

The Shaft:

The shaft of the stick uses a build that ensures optimal flexibility, weight and balance and provides an excellent response potential, according to SherWood’s description of the stick. How that translates on the ice is quite accurate. When we first started using the stick, we found that it was really quick to load and noticed that it somewhat improved the velocity of shots. We say somewhat as we don’t have a speed gun to measure the shots, but there is a definitive, noticeable difference in shot speed and power.

Additionally, what we usually find with new sticks is that it takes a while to get the optimum flex from the shaft, but on the first try the SherWood T-70 was quick to load. Though the flex has improved and has become more and more responsive the more we used it, the T-70 provided perhaps the quickest response on first time use than other sticks we have tested or used.

Otherwise, the shaft uses a design with rounded edges, making it feel good in the hand. The shaft’s circumference is not as big as some of the other makes like Easton S series, which for our test was great. Though the shaft’s circumference is not as big as others, it hasn’t sacrificed much in feel or  durability.

Durability

Durability of a hockey stick is perhaps one of the key considerations when buying a new stick. You want to be sure that your hard earned cash gets you a stick that does not snap on the first use and you want to be comfortable in the knowledge that the stick is capable of handling your shot selection.

The SherWood T-70 stick is quite durable thanks to the materials SherWood has used in the construction of the shaft. It has a unidirectional fiber core and combines fiberglass and carbon fiber weave in a custom blend to provide added durability. Though these materials provide extra durability in the shaft the downside is that they add in the weight of the stick. However, despite this, the stick is equally balanced, providing you with good flexibility and response potential.

The stick we have been testing has been used both in the training setting and in league level games. In games where hacking and slashing is common place, the stick has gotten a few scuff marks, but is not demonstrating any wear in the actual build of the stick, i.e. there are no chunks of the shaft or blade missing, only some paint work, which is to be expected.

The Blade:

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Curve comparison. Next to the CCM CL with 19 (Tavares) pattern. The T-70 blade is slightly shorter, but in similar specification

As said, the stick we have been using comes with the PP09 (Ryan) curve, which is a ½” heel curve blade with a 5.5 lie and round toe. Modelled after the Anaheim Ducks star, Bobby Ryan, the blade pattern is closely matched by those of CCM’s Tavares (or 19), Reeboks’ Spezza or Phaneuf (P36 or P36A), Easton’s Cammalleri/Zetterberg, or Bauer’s Staal (P91).

The transition to the blade was quite easy as the stick we previously had in use was with a CCM Tavares (19) pattern and as the image shows, there is very little in between the two. Though at the start and the first few shots with the stick did fly over the net and there was some getting used to required, the blades were quite similarly matched in terms of the pattern.

Thanks to the foam core used in the T-70 blade, the blade does feed through to the shaft really well and does what SherWood says with the description in that it reduces the vibration when taking a shot. Like mentioned the foam core in a hockey stick blade is by no means unique these days, but the way it is deployed in the shaft makes all the difference. You might remember from the Beaster stick review where we mentioned that the blade didn’t really feed through to the shaft properly, but with the T-70 there were no such issues. When you receive a pass you know that he puck is on your blade and you don’t have to spend time with your head down wondering whether or not the puck is on your blade.

In game situations:

We have now been using the stick for about a month and in game situations we have beenImage notching up points with the stick since the first game we used it in. Like mentioned the stick is durable and has withstood the toils of a hockey game really well. The stick responds well to shot selections and like mentioned the talk of shot velocity is not a lie. Specially with wrist shots, the stick is in its element, though having said that, its not a stick that is designed to snipe wristers but can also handle a heavy slap shot with ease and has helped hit the top shelf on more than one occasion both in trainings and in games.

Conclusion:

The SherWood T-70 stick is a great stick and recommended for league players, or to those who are looking for a stick that is both durable and incredibly responsive. The features set that the stick offers is closely matched by the CCM U+ Pro, but is cheaper than many of the other sticks at this range. By no means is the price a sign of a bad stick as with the SherWood T-70, you get a stick that performs equally well, if not better than some of the competing sticks in the same category. Whilst it may not come packed with all the features of the T-90, the T-70 is definitely a stick where price, durability and performance meet.

Pros:

  • Design of the shaft fits perfectly in your hand
  • Responsiveness
  • Quick load and release
  • No vibrations through the shaft
  • Good price point
  • Great balance throughout the stick

Cons:

  • Non grip coating (Only on the model we tested)
  • Heavier than some other sticks in similar range

You can buy the SherWood T-70 and other hockey gear at:

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(Edit: I’ve had an issue with WordPress and the HTML code, where the formatting looks pretty messy right now, I’m going to attempt to tweak it tomorrow)

I’ve been wanting to do a post about the latest hockey gear that’s come out. There’s always been a part of me that’s been really interested in the different makes out there and how the kit differs from one another. Before I go any further, I must stress that this is only based on information and marketing collateral, rather than my own opinion. I would absolutely love to review these products properly, so if any of the manufacturers read this are into the idea, drop me a line.

We start off with Bauer. Bauer has been a staple of the hockey world for, probably as long as hockey has been around. Since getting rid of the Nike Bauer brand, the company has brought out some of the most preferred equipment we see the NHL Pros use.

Skates:
Bauer has brought out the Bauer Supreme Total One NXG to accompany the APX to its flagship range of skates. The Total One NXG features a new TUUK fusion blade, which has been designed to reduce the weight of the runner by 27%. As with most skates today, a lot of attention is being paid to the fit. The emphasis is on getting the skate as comfortable as possible and the Total ONE NXG features a new insole that supposedly gives a better fit and more responsive skate.

Helmet:
The one big thing that Bauer has brought out is the RE-AKT helmet. The helmet takes its look from the HH4500 helmet. Rather annoyingly I’ve seen some adverts and sites advertise the helmet with the ‘passes the mirror test’ tag, which is just a personal pet peeve of mine. The RE-AKT has been designed to reduce the risk of concussion from direct impact to the head. At impact, the helmet’s SUSPEND-TECH free floating liner should move independently from the VERTEX FOAM liner to should reduce excessive intra-cranial movement.  Phew, don’t you just love these terms SUSPEND-TECH, VERTEX FOAM. Wow

Sticks:

While during the playoffs, I have seen many players use a new-ish TotalOne stick I haven’t seen further details of it emerge as yet so I don’t know what to say about it. However, the Bauer Vapor APX stick has been around for a while, but I thought that I’d include it in the round up anyways. Bauer claims that it is the smartest stick in the history of the game. The stick supposedly fits all types of shots and combines the Intelli-Sense Shot Technology and Bauer TotalOne’s blade to give it that soft feel.

CCM:

CCM has been a brand I’ve been using ever since Koho was swallowed up by the Hockey Company. I used Koho sticks/blades nearly my whole life. For the roundup, CCM doesn’t have a new skate to include as it is going with its U+ CL skate. Perhaps the biggest additions to the range is in the field of the protective equipment.

CCM has expanded its U+ CL range to the protective equipment and should a player wear CL shoulder pads, CL elbow pads, CL shin guards, CL skates, CL gloves (introduced last year) and use a CL stick, the overall equipment weight would be reduced by 25% compared to other manufacturers. Impressive, but my main question is: If it’s that light, will it be any good at protecting the body. There is also the CS, or Crazy Strong, variant of the equipment line available as well.

Shoulder pads

The CL pads feature CCM’s U-foam caps and molded floating ventilated sternum. The U-Foam has also been utilised in the body of the body of the shoulder pads. The pads look pretty decent, but I’d have to get my hands on them to see what they are really like. There isn’t much else to report on the pad and its features apart from the fact that it contains a lot of U-Foam.

Elbow pads

The CL elbow pads feature a 3-piece construction and reinforced caps. The pads come with a neoprene wrap in the liner and also features neoprene in the elbow bed for improved fit. For the forearm and bicep there is U-Foam protection.

Shin guards:

The CL shinguards feature vented caps and an anatomical shell design. The thigh guard can be removed for a bit of customisation. I personally don’t like the thigh guard in my pads so it’s good to see that it continues to be a removable feature. The knee bed is segmented with neoprene lock zone, which should ensure that the pads stay in place and provide additional comfort. The pads are attached with cross strapped in the back, which allows for the calf wrap to provide protection to the back of the leg.

Sticks

The CL stick hasn’t really changed much since the last re-vamp of it. It now carries the name of CCM CL Midnight. Otherwise the features of the stick looks the same. The biggest improvements as far as I can see on paper are in the construction. CCM has introduced something it calls True Spear technology which is supposed to ensure optimal energy transfer for shots.

The other stick is the U+ Pro, which comes weighing in at 455 grams. Like the CL Midnight, it uses aerial grade carbon to make it a lightweight stick. The blade uses PRB Graphite technology to create a similar sweet spot for an accurate shot. Like the CL the stick also includes the true spear technology.

Perhaps the most interesting stick from the CCM Staple is the RBZ, which is set to come out in Fall 2012. We’ve seen pictures of it and know it’s been used by Ryan Nugent-Hopkins and Gabriel Landesgok and that it’s been designed in partnership with the golf company TaylorMade. That’s all I’ve managed to dig out on the stick so far.

 

 

 

For great deals on top of the range hockey equipment, please click on the image below: