Long Term Review: Sher-Wood Rekker EK 15 stick

Posted: July 21, 2014 in Uncategorized

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Stick specs
Flex: 75
Weight: Approx 375 grams
Blade pattern: PP88 (Ryan II)
Grip coated

photo 1Sher-Wood Rekker EK 15 came out with a lot of buzz around it during launch. The stick was advertised to be the lightest stick on the market (With Stastny curve). The stick has been in use from December onwards and has been used in league level play and training. Below are our findings:

First impressions:

At delivery, the first thing we noticed was how light the box was. It felt like there was nothing inside and once the stick was un-boxed it felt ridiculously light. The Rekker EK15 feels like a perfectly balanced stick when you hold it in your hands and you can feel that you are holding a high quality product.

The product itself is clean and didn’t come with any warehouse dust or any paint scraps which can sometimes make its way onto a stick. Sher-Wood says that it uses a “handmade manufacturing process” that reduces the chances of defect on sticks. The aim of this process is to make the stick more durable and to remove surplus materials, which can add to the weight, balance and durability of a stick.

The Rekker EK 15 uses carbon fibre that is 30% lighter than the ones used in other sticks which gives it that light feel. As with other light sticks and testing out the flex on it, the first question we want answered is that how durable is it and will it handle a slap shot without breaking. The 75 flex stick is new to us as we have previously used mainly 85 flex sticks so the Rekker EK 15 is a new frontier in that respect.

In terms of looks, Sher-Wood opted for a slick black coating on the stick with the branding in white on the shaft of the stick. This time the branding is visible on the shaft, something that was lacking in the Nexon range as it tended to warp around the shaft in the higher range models.

On the ice:

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The Sher-Wood Rekker EK15 comes with a new VRF 2 blade, designed to give your stick a ‘new’ feel for longer

Using the Rekker EK15 on the ice for the first time was an eye opening experience. Having reviewed the Nexon 12, we knew that Sher-Wood is capable of producing great sticks where you get an amazing feel for the puck. Given that the EK15 is lighter than the Nexon range, we wondered whether the stick was actually able to provide a similar feel.

From the first time we handled a puck we realised that the stick provides a feel that is equal to, or even better to the Nexon range. The feel is comparable to Warrior’s Covert DT1 stick. Both sticks provide a great feel for the puck and feed it straight to your hands.

One of the big improvements we noticed on the stick was the blade. On the preceding model, the Nexon range, the blade had a tendency to give out quite soon into the life of the stick, so you lost a bit of feel and a bit of the ‘pop’ when that happened.In terms of shooting, the Rekker EK15 provides amazing pop. This is thanks to the new VRF 2 core in the blade (VRF stands for Vibration Reduction Foam). What the VRF does, is it keeps the blade and the stick feeling like new for longer. With new sticks you get that crisp and great pop on all the shots, but over time the blade gives way. As said, the Nexon range was prone to giving up at the blade, but after 6 months of active use, the Rekker EK 15 still has that ‘new stick feel’.

The stick also has a flex free zone, which means that it has a four inch area at the top and providing you don’t cut below this zone, the flex doesn’t change. What some other manufacturers have, such as Bauer, the stick comes at a certain flex, but the flex changes by how much you have to cut down the stick. Say your 85 flex stick might actually be a 90 flex after you’ve cut it down.

In terms of kick point, the Rekker EK15 has a really low kick point to getting a shot off quickly.

In six months of use, the blade and stick still feel new, an upgrade from the Nexon range.

In six months of use, the blade and stick still feel new, an upgrade from the Nexon range.

The Nexon range had a low kick point, but the Rekker EK range has an even lower kickpoint. Indeed, when shooting, the stick is easy to load for a quick release snap and wrist shot.

This stick is suited to the players who are looking for something that provides them with a quick release and want to have that crisp feel to their stick for longer, also if you’re a player who loves to dangle, this is the stick for you.

After six months of use, the only damage that is on the stick, is the grip coating coming off at certain parts of the shaft, so that is something we hope Sher-Wood will look into in future iterations of the stick. However, it still feels like new when you’re shooting, despite having a few skate scuff marks on the blade.


Price:

Additionally to the great features found in the Sher-Wood Rekker EK15, the price point is an amenable one when comparing to some of the other top of the range sticks on the market. You can pick up the Rekker EK15 for approximately €30-70 cheaper than the top of the range sticks when compared to the likes of CCM, Bauer, Easton and Warrior. The stick retails at approximately €199 in Europe or £288 in the UK (depending on retailer).

Overall:

photo 5The Rekker EK15 is a great stick that more than holds its own against the other top marquees. It is a feature rich stick that provides you with great feel for the puck and is easy to load and release. If you are shopping for a stick, it should definitely be one of the sticks that you need to try out when you’re going through the stick rack.

Pros:
• Light weight
• Excellent price point for top of the range stick
• Quick release on shots
• True one piece throughout
• Stronger blade than on predecessor models

Cons:
• Grip coating has started to come off after extensive use

Comments
  1. Jeremy says:

    Just got my EK15 today, opted for the “Vintage” model which looks like the old school Sherwood sticks. Very excited to get it on the ice.

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